Two Books about One

In this post, we share two more magical books that ask this same question:  Is one always one? The 1st book, More than One, was written by Miriam Schlein and illustrated by Donald Crews. The 2nd book about one is Only One written by Marc Harshman and illustrated Barbara Garrison.

Uncovering the Complexities of Counting with a Magical Counting Book

I never would have guessed 15 years ago that I would STILL be learning about counting.  But listening to children engage with simple prompts and carefully crafted images like in How Many? shows me there are deeper truths and things to be understood about counting and all K-12 mathematics learning.   Thank you Christopher Danielson once again for providing a resource to wander and wonder with.

One is a Snail, Ten is a Crab

The magic here is that the positive feeling the book gives the students carries over into our inquiries about how to make up the different numbers in other ways, even when we move away from the animals to representing them, with Cuisenaire rods or written equations. Seeing different ways of representing numbers is an important part of our learning, but the book allowed us to visit this again without it seeming like ‘more of the same’: we were not dealing with raw numbers, but with feet on sand.

Story+Math+Diversity = One Mathical Book

Baby Goes to Market was written by Nigerian-born Atinuke. Atinuke started her career doing traditional oral storytelling. Atinuke's story follows Baby and Mama through a Nigerian Market. Baby's is so adorable that the banana seller gives Baby six bananas. Baby eats one and secretly puts five bananas in Mama's basket.  Baby continues to collect items at the market, eating one of each, and placing the rest in Mama's basket.   The story ends with a secret between Baby and reader that is sure to bring a smile.

The Joy of a Giant Jelly Bean Math Picture Book

How giant is this book? Measuring 11.25 inches by 14.25 inches, it’s the largest picture book on our shelf. The bright jelly bean illustrations in contrast to the adorable black and white cartoon characters talking in speech balloons make a sweet backdrop for the math in this book.

1+1=5: A Book to Explore Unlikely Additions

Let me be clear, this book is NOT trying to confuse children into thinking that the addition statement 1+1=3 is a true!  Under the arithmetic operation of addition, of course the expression 1+ 1 has only one value, 2.  In order for the equation 1+1=3 to make sense, we need to add in some units.

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